Lesson 4 of 10
In Progress

Exposition

Matthew Colon October 3, 2020
  1. Audiences want to be shown your story, not told. Think about a story-based game you’ve played; does it show you its story or does it convey the story through dialogue and long expository text/voice overs?
  2. How are you showing the audience your project’s story rather than explicitly telling them, and what can you do to show more?
  3. Seeding spreads tiny bits of exposition fairly uniformly across the entire story as compared to dumping a lot of exposition in one spot. Think about a story-based game you’ve played that has seeding; how does it implement seeding to give you clues to the story throughout the game?
  4. Planting chooses a specific spot for a unit of exposition and deliberately places it there. Think about a story-based game you’ve played that has planting; how does it implement planting to pay off in an unexpected way later on in the game?
  5. Foreshadowing hints at something that will either happen or become clearer and potentially important later in the story. Think about a story-based game you’ve played that has foreshadowing; how does it implement foreshadowing to hint at something later in the game’s story?
  6. How are you currently using seeding, planting, and foreshadowing in your project, and what can you do to better implement these?
  7. What units of exposition in your project can be classified as “Need to Know,” “Could Wait,” and “Incidental?”
  8. How are you balancing your story’s pay off in with living up to the build up you’ve prepared and not making your audience wait too long?

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